Low Level Mundane Trap Ideas!


Was thinking this morning about traps, and how you could do the cheap, low effort, non elaborate traps that they are so mundane that the average person looking for them, wont even think about them, and then it hit me...

Low Level Mundane trap ideas. Sure maybe someone somewhere has talked about this or done it, but why not explore it for a bit and see what we get?

So far I've thought up:

  • Thin wire at barely the ankle height down a hallway that is lit somewhat well. It could trigger something or just be a decoy of absolutely nothing and putting the characters on guard the rest of the adventure.
  • Greasing up a hallway that slants downwards will sure cause the characters to slip and slide down them. Heck even slick up the stairs, that will surely cause a few slips and falls (maybe even laughter in the group).
  • Any tight squeeze the characters have to go through can be lined with itching powder or ground up poison ivy dust.
  • Doors that when opened drop a bucket of tar on the group, causing a tiny bit of damage, but then everything starts sticking to their armor as they walk around.
  • Open a chest and the character gets sprayed with sneezing powder, causing them to randomly sneeze for the next little while.. think of the rolls in battle, "whoops you missed cause you had to sneeze!" or what happens to that wizard spell?
  • A tower the characters have to climb is full of poison ivy on the outside, so they have to figure a way to climb up, and not suffer the effects of it.
  • Character finds a sword but its coated in a slippery substance they can't get off, but the sword is a really cool magical weapon... Attempt to use it, there is a chance it flies out of their hands.
What ideas come to your mind, please comment and share it up!

Comments

  1. Add a bunch of tiny bells or rattles to your tar trap and no one can sneak or stealth.

    ReplyDelete

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